Great interview with Andrew Petiprin on “Becoming Catholic in a Time of Scandal”

Peter Jesserer Smith has a great interview up at the National Catholic Register with Andrew Petiprin, a former Episcopalian canon working in the chancery of an American diocese, who became Catholic with his family on Jan. 1.

Some might therefore look at Andrew Petriprin as a man who has sold everything to run into a burning house. He left his priestly ministry and position as a canon to the bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee to follow Jesus Christ’s call to enter the Catholic Church Jan. 1, the Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God.

But Petiprin told the Register that amid the Church’s worst scandal since the Reformation era, there is an “outpouring of grace happening now” — and that, for whatever reason in the midst of this present crisis, God has drawn him and other Christian disciples of Jesus Christ into the fullness of communion and truth found in his Catholic Church.

And, of course, we have to look at what he says about Anglicanorum coetibus and Anglican patrimony!

But as far as future ministry in the Church, or my role in connection to the ordinariate and things like that, I’m wide-open to discernment, and we’ll just see as things develop.

I think the ordinariate is an incredible answer to prayer, both on the Anglican side and on the Catholic side. I think it’s just a wonderful thing for Anglicans to be able to bring gifts into the Catholic Church that can enrich the Church as a whole, and I would love to be a bearer of those gifts. So we’ll see what the future holds. I just know, in the short term, I’m just excited about being a Catholic husband and dad and getting used to the new world that I inhabit.

-snip-

You mentioned that Anglicans can bring certain gifts into the Catholic Church that can really enrich Catholic life and faith. Could you expound on that a little bit?

Those looking at this situation need to remember that the Catholic Church in a sense decides what the gifts are that Anglicans bring into the Church. So that’s an important thing to note. But the thing that delights me is thinking about the liturgical and musical tradition. Anglicans have a wonderful tradition, too, of using Scripture in a way that I think can really speak deeply to the Catholic Church: the tradition of praying the daily offices [Morning and Evening Prayer, also called Mattins and Evensong] and praying the Psalms are not just things that are done in monasteries (although it’s wonderful that they are done in monasteries), but those things are done in a parish church or indeed even in a home, in a family context. Those are really wonderful things.

Anglicans are also used to (with the exception of just a few kind of very large parishes) a smaller church context with more of an intimate social life and that sort of thing. I think that could be something that could speak deeply to people’s needs in the wider Catholic Church, as well: that going to church isn’t just about fulfilling your Sunday obligation and then going home, but it could actually be a smaller-scale thing where you’re actually sharing your lives more deeply [with fellow parishioners] and celebrating the Lord’s Day in a more holistic way.

It’s a long interview and well-worth reading in its entirety.  Here are a few excerpts to whet your appetite:

Read the whole thing here.

 

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