Lent in a time of pandemic

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St. Barnabas Catholic Church, the Ordinariate parish in Omaha, held a Eucharistic Procession in Time of Mortality and Epidemic yesterday.

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Across North America many Catholic Masses have been cancelled along with other public gatherings.   Government officials are encouraging social distancing to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.   I have never seen anything like this in my lifetime—unless I recall the days of the polio epidemic in my childhood in the years before the vaccine.

I think having Eucharistic Processions—-where people are in the fresh air and maintaining some distance —might be a good way to worship this Lent and bring a public message of hope and the need for repentance. 89858466_10163278102220154_6446690708081344512_o - Copy - Copy - Copy

Many Ordinariate members made a spiritual communion yesterday and watched the Mass at Mt. Calvary Catholic Church in Baltimore as it live streamed.  That’s what I did yesterday.

The procession chanting the Litany was powerful.

On March 13, St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, the Ordinariate parish in Bridgeport, PA offered a special Votive Mass for the Sick.

What are you doing to worship God this Lent while ordinary means of worship are being suspended?

Any good links out there to other live streamed Masses?

I would encourage you to check out Daily Morning and Evening Prayer if you haven’t already.  At the site, you can find out ways to join others twice a day in praying the offices together via conference call.

Sitting in stacks around my house are a number of spiritual  books that I have not read.  If I can get off social media regarding breaking Wuhan virus updates, it would be good to sit down and read them straight through instead of skipping around.  Last year as a Lenten exercise I read Cardinal Robert Sarah’s  The Power of Silence: Against the Dictatorship of Noise.  I highly recommend it!

David Torkington is releasing twice a week a Mini Course on Prayer that you can find here.

Looks like we might be doing our Lenten School of Prayer by Skype or join.me this Thursday.  We are reading Torkington’s Wisdom from the Christian Mystics: How to Pray the Christian Way.  I highly recommend it.

Repent.  Repent.  Constantly repent and turn your heart towards God and abandon yourself to Him.

 

 

 

1 thought on “Lent in a time of pandemic

  1. I just saw a Facebook post by a friend noting that yesterday, the first day public Masses were suspended in Spain (which is hard-hit by the virus), the televised Mass was the most-watched TV show on Sunday morning (Spain has become notoriously slack in religious observance, so 1 million viewers in a nation of 47 million people — and on Sunday morning, not in prime time — is notable).

    Personally, I was glad to be able to worship live with Mount Calvary yesterday and this morning caught a streamed Mass from St Mary of Pine Bluff (WI), a lovely, simple Mass in a beautiful little church — the Ordinary Form, but celebrated ad orientem. After that, I began scouring YouTube for other streaming Masses — looking beyond the EWTN daily Mass, I also found one from Toronto, as well as streamed Masses from the Basilica at Fatima (Portugal), one by some Spanish Franciscans, and an Italian one from the Sanctuary of St. Pio. I’m hoping to find a French Mass that streams during the week and maybe a German-language one, so that I can attend Mass in a different language every day of the week.

    I’m surprised that all these dioceses where people are being deprived of Sunday Mass are not providing a streamed-video Mass. That should be a no-brainer, but I have not heard of a single diocese that is doing this, at least not in the US. Some bishops have said “make a spiritual communion,” but it is so much easier to do so when one is actually following the Mass. EWTN should not be the only one offering video Masses, at least not during all these mandatory closures.

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