Fr Paul of Graymoor (AD 1863 – 1940) and the Octave of Unity

[#20 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of January 13 – 19]

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HIS week in English Catholic History, we begin to celebrate the Octave of Unity from January 18th to the 25th. The Octave was created by Fr Paul of Graymoor, an Episcopalian priest and religious who brought his entire Anglican religious community corporately into union with the Catholic Church.

Fr. Paul was born Lewis Wattson to the Rev Joseph Wattson and his wife, Mary on January 16th in Millington, Maryland. Rev Wattson was strongly influenced by the writings of John Henry Newman and the Oxford movement in the Anglican Church in England. He was dismissed from his Episcopalian seminary on suspicion of being a Jesuit spy. Nevertheless he went on to become the rector of a small parish in Maryland.  

From 1882 to 1885, Lewis studied at the Episcopalian General Theological Seminary in New York.

in 1886, Lewis became an Episcopalian priest himself, serving as rector of St John’s Episcopal Church in Kingston, NY until 1895.

In 1893, Fr Lewis conceived of a religious order he wished to found, inspired by the life of St Francis of Assisi, Italy. Opening his Bible at random, his eyes fell upon Romans 5:11: “And not only so, but we also joy in God, through Our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.” Fr Lewis saw within the word “atonement” “At-one-ment”, and conceived the purpose of his order as bringing unity within the schism-troubled Church of God.

From 1895 to 1898, Fr Lewis joined and led a semi-monastic Episcopalian community of unmarried clergy in Omaha, Nebraska called the Associate Mission. During this period Fr Lewis corresponded with Sister Lurana White, discussing the possibilities of religious orders taking monastic vows within the Anglican Communion. Sister Lurana also went to visit the Anglican Sisters of Bethany in England to learn from their model. In 1898, Fr Lewis and Mother Lurana co-founded the Episcopalian Franciscan Friars and Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement in Garrison, New York. At this time, a common monastic practice, Fr Lewis took the religious name of Paul. They took possession of the Graymoor property in 1900.

Eight years later in 1908, Fr Paul created the Octave of Unity, a devotional intended to promote religious unity around the world.

On October 30th, 1909, Fr Paul and the Friars were accepted corporately into the Catholic Church as a community. In many ways this corporate reception foreshadowed the creation a century later of the Patrimonially English Ordinariates of the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum coetibus (November 4th, 2009) which would permit the incorporation of entire parishes with their priests into the Catholic Church.

Day 1, January 18th: The union of all Christians in the One True Faith and in the Church

Day 2, January 19th: The return of separated Eastern Christians to communion with the Holy See

Day 3, January 20th: The reconciliation of Anglicans with the Holy See

Day 4, January 21st: The reconciliation of European Protestants with the Holy See

Day 5, January 22nd: That American Christians become one in union with the Chair of Peter

Day 6, January 23rd: The restoration of lapsed Catholics to the sacramental life of the Church

Day 7, January 24th: That the Jewish people come into their inheritance in Jesus Christ

Day 8, January 25th: The missionary extension of Christ’s Kingdom throughout the World

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St. Benedict Biscop (AD 628 – 690)

[#19 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of January 6 – 12]

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HIS week in English Catholic History, we celebrate St. Benedict Biscop, whose feast day is January 12th.

St. Benedict was born in Northumbria to a noble family, and it is recorded he was a thane, or secular minister to King Oswiu for a time.

Good company breeds goodness in oneself, and Benedict decided to accompany St. Wilfrid (the Elder) to Rome as a companion at the age of 25. St. Bede the Venerable tells us that by the time the young Benedict left Rome for home, he was “full of fervour and enthusiasm for the good of the English Church.”

Twelve years later, he repeated the journey, this time to satisfy his habit of reading good books, which were more plentiful in Rome. On his way back from Rome, however, Benedict stopped at a monastery on the island of Lérins in France. There he remained for two years, taking monastic vows. Benedict returned to Rome thereafter, and was commissioned by Pope St. Vitalian to accompany Ss Theodore and Adrian (discussed in Issue # 3 of this series) to evangelise the English people. This mission commenced in AD 669.

Benedict was made the abbot of the monastery of Ss Peter and Paul at Canterbury, a role he remained in for two years. During this time, in keeping both with the intellectual Renaissance Ss Theodore and Adrian introduced in England, as well as his own proclivities, St Benedict created an excellent library for his monastery, stocked with both religious as well as the classical works of ancient literature.

In 674, St. Benedict was granted by King Ecgfrith the land he needed to build a monastery in his native Northumbria, naming it St. Peter’s. He went to the continent to recruit the masons he needed to build a splendid monastery in the pre-Romanesque style. His fifth and final journey to Rome in 679 was, again, to buy books – this time for his new monastery – as well as relics of saints to surround his community with the visible remains of that “cloud of witnesses” mentioned in Hebrews, and privileges for his monastery from Pope Agatho.

Returning from this journey, Benedict also brought with him Abbot John of St. Martin’s Abbey in Rome. From John, the monks learned how to perform the Roman rubrics and how to read and write Latin in Roman script.

The monastery was a great success, providing the country with the tangible presence of holiness and an ascetic lifestyle for men who wished to pursue this austere mode of life in service to God. King Ecgfrith therefore asked St. Benedict to build a second monastery, which he did at Jarrow, most famous as the abode of the Venerable St. Bede himself, who provides us with so much valuable information about the English Church of this period. Bede actually knew St. Benedict Biscop himself and learned from him. It is from Bede’s pen that we receive almost all our information about his holy master. Jarrow was also the first monastery in the British Isles to be constructed in stone.

We read that Benedict suffered a long illness at the end of his life that left him bed-ridden for three years until his death in 690. Today relics of St. Benedict Biscop can be found in the cities of Thorney and Glastonbury. He is honored today as a patron of the English Benedictines, and of the fine arts which he spent so much care in bringing to England to civilise it. His primary contribution was in bringing the worship and level of culture and technology of the English Church into unity (or catholicity) with that of Rome and the rest of the continent, thereby strengthening both his island home and enriching greater Christendom.

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St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (AD 1774 – 1821)

[#18 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of Dec. 30 – Jan. 5]

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HIS week in English Catholic History, we celebrate St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first erstwhile Episcopalian and culturally English native-born citizen of the United States of America we have covered in this series. She is celebrated in America on January 4, the day of her death.

Elizabeth was born into the cream of high New York City society. Thanks to her parents’ care for her education, she was accomplished in French, an accomplished pianist and was adept in the art of horsemanship. She was a popular socialite and when she was nineteen married a 25-year-old wealthy businessman and trader, William Magee Seton in 1794. Their marriage was witnessed by the Episcopalian Bishop of New York, Samuel Provoost.

The couple was very happy together and had five children. They lived together in a fashionable residence on Wall Street, and attended the famous Trinity Episcopal Church. But eventually William’s business failed after several of his trade ships were sunk or captured. William had always been ill, suffering from the chronic disease tuberculosis, eventually succumbing to the disease in 1803.

Shortly before William’s death, in a last-ditch effort to restore his health, the couple travelled to Italy, staying with William’s business associates the Fillicchis. While there, Elizabeth was exposed to Catholicism, spending hours in the nearby Catholic chapel, and the Catholic family they stayed with answered Elizabeth’s questions and furnished her with reading material defending the Catholic Church from many of the common objections to the Catholic Church.

Nevertheless, when she returned to New York, Elizabeth continued to attend her Episcopalian parish. She started an academy for training young ladies to support herself and her young daughters. Two years later, however, after a period of deep struggle, she came into full communion with the Catholic Church, convinced that Jesus was present in the Sacrament of the Catholic Church in a unique way. Her academy also failed afrer parents withdrew their daughters from the new Catholic’s school.

On the verge of moving to Canada, where Catholics were more numerous, Elizabeth met Louis Dubourg, a Sulpician Abbot and president of St. Mary’s College whose order had fled the French Terror. In 1809 she moved to Maryland and founded Saint Joseph’s Academy and Free School to educate Catholic girls, funded by the wealthy convert Samuel Cooper. It was the first free school in America. Regarding education, Elizabeth said, “Take great care about the people with whom your children associate.”

Elizabeth established a religious community called the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph that adopted the rule of life of the Daughters of Charity in France. She spent the rest of her life developing this community. She died of tuberculosis herself at the age of 46. Her last words were, “Blood of Jesus, wash me.”

Eventually the Sisters of Charity took the necessary steps to merge with the French Daughters of Charity, as Elizabeth had desired, but which had been impossible in her lifetime due to the turbulent state of affairs in France during the early Nineteenth Century.

Pope St. John XXIII beatified Elizabeth in 1963, saying “In a house that was very small, but with ample space for charity, she sowed a seed in America which by Divine Grace grew into a large tree.”

She was canonized in 1974 by Pope St. Paul VI, who said: “Elizabeth Ann Seton is a saint… Elizabeth Ann Seton was wholly American! Rejoice for your glorious daughter. Be proud of her. And know how to preserve her fruitful heritage.”

Further reading:

Charles Coulomb’s informative vignette from yesteryear here.

Academic Study on St Elizabeth’s spiritual direction practices.

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A Visitor to the Ordinariate

‘Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the parish

Not a heresy was stirring, neither subtle nor garish;

The media were pushing secular worldviews with care,

In hopes for the young people’s minds to ensnare:

The children to space out on unneeded meds;

With visions of life without God in their heads;

But our parish priest rises to lead us in prayer:

“Most Beloved in Christ, be it this Christmas Eve our care

And delight to prepare us to hear once again

The message of the angels unto Bethlehem…”

And the carols and lessons all too quickly pass,

And we kneel as our celebrant says midnight Mass.

The collection is lighter than ’twas years before,

When yet we were all on the Tiber’s far shore. Continue reading

St. Thomas Becket (AD c. 1119 – 1170)

[#17 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of December 23 – 29]

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HIS week in English Catholic History, we celebrate St. Thomas Becket on December 29, the day of his martyrdom.

He was born in Pettyside, London. Due to his father’s financial setbacks, he had to leave school to support himself, and eventually started working as a clerk for Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury. There, his talent won his master’s favor and Thomas became the Archbishop’s most trusted clerk.

Theobald used Thomas in several delicate negotiations, sent him to study canon law for a year, and eventually ordained him a deacon in 1154 and bestowed upon him the Archdeaconry of Canterbury. Continue reading

The O Antiphons (6th Century)

[#16 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of December 16 – 22]

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HIS week in English Catholic History, we examine the O Antiphons, which in the Ordinariate are sung during Evening Prayer on December 17-24 (in the Ordinariate’s Office) or 16 -23 depending upon what Office is used and are based on the Messianic prophecies of Isaiah.

 

O Sapientia, December 17; see Isaiah 11:2-3, Isaiah 28:29, Sirach 24:1-5, Wisdom of Solomon 8:1

O Wisdom, coming forth from the mouth of the Most High, reaching from one end to the other, mightily and sweetly ordering all things: come and teach us the way of prudence.

O Adonai, December 18; see Isaiah 11:4-5, Isaiah 33:22; Exodus 3:2; Exodus 24:12

O Adonai, and leader of the House of Israel, who appeared to Moses in the fire of the burning bush and gave him the law on Sinai: come and redeem us with an outstretched arm.

O Radix Jesse, December 19; see Isaiah 11:1, Isaiah 11:10, Isaiah 45:14, Isaiah 52:15, Micah 5:2, Romans 15:12

O Root of Jesse, standing as a sign among the peoples; before you kings will shut their mouths, to you nations will make their prayer: come and deliver us, and delay no longer.

O Clavis David, December 20; see Isaiah 22:22, Isaiah 9:7, Isaiah 42:7

O Key of David and scepter of the House of Israel; you open and no one can shut; you shut and no one can open: come and lead the prisoners from the prison house, those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death.

O Oriens, December 21; see Isaiah 9:2, Isaiah 60:1-2, Malachi 4:2

O Radiant Dawn, splendor of light eternal and sun of righteousness: come and enlighten those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death.

O Rex Gentium, December 22; see Isaiah 9:6, Isaiah 2:4, Isaiah 28:16, Isaiah 64:8, Ephesians 2:14

O King of the nations, and their desire, the cornerstone making both one: come and save the human race, which you fashioned from clay.

O Emmanuel, December 23; see Isaiah 7:14, Matthew 1:22-23

O Emmanuel, our king and our lawgiver, the hope of the nations and their Savior: come and save us, O Lord our God.

O Virgo Virginum, December 24; see Song of Songs 1:5, Memorare, Luke 2:5-6

O Virgin of virgins, how shall this be? For neither before thee was any like thee, nor shall there be after. Daughters of Jerusalem, why marvel ye at me? The thing which ye behold is a divine mystery.

Apparently originating in or prior to the Sixth Century, the O antiphons appear both in the Breviarum Romanum, the Church of England’s Common Worship liturgy and now in the Divine Office of the Ordinariates of Anglicanorum coetibus.

Note: If you would like to pray the O Antiphons as part of Evening Prayer, please visit prayer.covert.org Continue reading

St. John Roberts, Martyr (AD 1577 – 1610)

[#15 in the series This Week in English Catholic History: Week of December 9 – 15]

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HIS week, on December 10, the day of his martyrdom, we remember St. John Roberts. St. John Roberts was a Welsh Benedictine monk and priest. He was born in 1577 at Trawsfynydd, a small village in northern Wales. His parents were John and Anna Roberts of Rhiw Goch Farm. Like many members of the Ordinariates of Anglicanorum cœtibus today, John was baptized as a Protestant.

He attended Oxford in 1595 before leaving after two years to study law at Furnival’s Inn, London. He later traveled in Europe, and converted to Catholicism after visiting Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Also instrumental in his conversion was the influence of a Catholic fellow-countryman. When John converted, he abandoned his legal studies. On the advice of Fr. John Cecil, Roberts moved to Spain to attend the English seminary at Valladolid, before later leaving to become a monk at the local monastery, St. Benedict’s.

After his ordination in 1602, John led an undercover mission of Catholic priests to England, where as an important part of his evangelization he worked with plague victims in London. He was repeatedly caught, imprisoned, and banished to the continent, but Saint John kept returning to England. On his fifth mission to England, he was followed by his former mentor, ex-priest-turned-spy John Cecil (alias John Snowden), who had traitorously compiled a dossier on Roberts for King James I–Yes, the same King James after whom was named the much-celebrated 1611 King James Version of the Bible, which included the deuterocanon and almost verbatim the words of the Lord’s Prayer as they currently appear in the Catholic Novus Ordo Missal of 1970 and the Ordinariates’ Divine Worship Missal of 2013. God uses whom He will for his unsearchable purposes.

Fr. Roberts was arrested by the King’s agents right after he had finished saying Mass, and he was taken to prison while still wearing his Eucharistic vestments. The night before his hanging, a devout Spanish lady arranged for him to have dinner with 18 other Catholic prisoners. During their supper together, St. John was full of joy. He felt self-conscious about this, and asked his hostess, “Do you think I may be giving bad example by my joy?” She said, “No, certainly not. You could not do any better than to let everyone see the cheerful courage you have as you are about to die for Christ.”

On December 10, St. John Roberts – as was traditionally allotted commoners deemed traitors to King and country – was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. Like our Lord himself by tradition at the time of his crucifixion, John was 33 years old. In jubilant mockery of a ceremony designed to strike fear into the hearts of would-be Catholics, when John saw the fire in which his bowels were to be burned, he said, “Ah, I see you have prepared a hot breakfast for us!”

Usually, the prisoner was disemboweled while still alive, but St. John Roberts was so popular among the poor because of his work with plague victims, that they insisted he be killed first so as not to feel the pain, and the will of the common people prevailed at least that far.

His heart was then held aloft by the executioner, who said, “Behold the heart of the traitor!” But the angry crowd, instead of saying the standard response (“Long live the king!”), said nothing. It was dead silent.

Saint John Roberts, defender of the Poor and the Sick, Martyr for the True Faith, pray for us sinners!

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For a weekly dose of English Catholic Patrimony, if your Ordinariate parish or parochial community would like to receive This Week in English Catholic History in advance in single page black-and-white pdf form (perhaps inserted in the bulletin), please contact us at <foster1452@gmail.com>, and we will be happy to oblige, gratis

Written by Mr. John Burford, IV and Dr. Foster Lerner of Incarnation Catholic Church in Orlando, Florida; a parish of The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter © 2018.

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John (wearing purple tie, above) is the founder and owner of Magnolia Prep, an SAT and ACT tutoring business with branches in several major US cities. Foster (wearing golden tie, above) holds a Doctorate in Medicine from  Nova Southeastern University Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, and is currently pursuing post-graduate studies in medicine.

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